Blockchain Use in Simplifying Payments

Blockchain Use in Simplifying Payments

Payment ecosystems are evolving at an accelerating pace to embrace new transaction processing methods and technologies. Let us understand how we can use blockchain use in simplifying payments.

The payment verticals of retail banking, merchant retail, transaction banking, billers, and digital banking that have traditionally operated in isolation are evolving toward a consolidated, real-time, any-to-any ecosystem.

Blockchain’s Impact

Payment ecosystems square measure evolving toward a period of time, any-to-any payments experience for consumers; blockchain is a fundamentally disruptive technology that will play a role in the evolution toward real time.

Blockchain has the flexibility to modernize a payment’s elementary imperative of transferring price between multiple parties, securely and with minimal operational or technical friction. Modernizing the fundamental imperative delivers substantial benefits in the future use of computing for banks, businesses and governments.

Recent rapid growth of peer-to-peer market exchanges for lending (Zopa, Lending Club and Funding Circle, etc.), accommodation (AirBnB) and taxi services (Uber) has demonstrated the potential of peer-to-peer architectures. Blockchain has the potential to accelerate and change such models in each new and existing markets.

The areas of application for blockchain stretch so much on the far side pure payments. Across the banking system, uses include post-trade settlement, asset management, securities, and trade finance. Beyond banking, blockchain interest includes insurance, government, identity management, and accounting services. Not only is this likely to generate new opportunities for payment providers, but also new entrants with disruptive business models, as new market areas become more practically addressable.

BLOCKCHAIN USE IN SIMPLIFYING PAYMENTS

Blockchain technologies are immature and their ability to support the challenging non-functional requirements of payment services has yet to be proven.

Current blockchain proof-of-work algorithms require seven seconds on average to gain consensus; further technical maturity is required in this area to support consensus in under 25 milliseconds. Recent advancements leveraging a proof-of-stake approach hold promise to improve consensus performance. Technical advancements are being made toward maturity; technical maturity has accelerated over the past year, fuelled by increasing blockchain investments worldwide that exceed $1.5 billion.

Different types of uses in payment system:

  1. Value Transfer:
    The use case for transferring funds between parties is the major focus. Blockchain 2.0 technologies could be applied to a variety of different payment sceneries.

    In single currency domestic payment the impact could be to reduce or remove the need for central counterparty and the delays in setting transaction net or gross in real-time. Transfers in multiple currencies between countries cross border payments.
  2. Trade Finance:
    The use case for trade finance covers a single common record of the liabilities and obligations of parties in trade finance. Possible users of blockchain 2.0 include: invoice fraud prevention, process efficiency, service improvement.
  3. Reference Data:
    Enable the rapid, auditable and secure updating of records by any authorized participant and sharing the change across the network of users. Potential areas where these technologies could be used to streamline the update process and simplify integration into existing payments processing include hot card files, sanctions lists, routing records etc.

As real-time, open-source and trusted platforms that securely transmit data and value, they can help banks not only reduce the cost of processing payments, but also create new products and services that can generate important new revenue streams.

The biggest key to turning the potential of blockchain’s use in simplifying payments into reality is a collaborative effort among banks to create the network necessary to support global payments. Blockchain technology itself works—there’s no debate about that. Now it’s time for banks to seem at the larger image and work along and with non-banks—to facilitate outline the backbone which will underpin a universally accepted, ubiquitous global payment system which will remodel however banks execute transactions.